Archives for Rabbits

Most Common Obese Exotic Pets: No. 3 Rabbits

Which species of exotic pets tend to pack on the pounds? This week, we’re looking at the top five species I treat for obesity. No. 3 on my list of obesity-prone pets are bunnies! Dangle a carrot in front of a rabbit, and that bunny should hop. But if he is overweight, as are many of the pet rabbits I see in my practice, then he might not be able to. Just as in people,
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Why Does My Rabbit… Not Eat Hay?

Many healthy rabbits will turn up their noses at hay because they are offered excessive amounts of pelleted food. This is because most rabbits prefer pellets to hay. Rabbit pellets are predominantly made of carbohydrates, and like most people, rabbits love their carbs and will choose them over fiber (hay). The general rule for healthy adult bunnies is no more than one-quarter cup of timothy hay-based pellets per 5 pounds of body weight each day.
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Why Does My Rabbit… Eat His Poop?

It may seem gross, but rabbits normally eat some of their feces once a day, either early in the morning or late at night. These special feces are called cecotropes, or “night feces.” They are produced through fermentation of food in the part of the rabbit’s digestive tract called the cecum. Cecotropes are soft feces that are nutrient-rich and are passed out of the body like normal stool but then are re-ingested later by the
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Is Your Rabbit Eating His Poop?

It may seem gross, but rabbits normally eat some of their feces once a day, either early in the morning or late at night. These special feces are called cecotropes, or “night feces.” They are produced through fermentation of food in the part of the rabbit’s digestive tract called the cecum. Cecotropes are soft feces that are nutrient-rich and are passed out of the body like normal stool but then are re-ingested later by the
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Multiplying like rabbits: to spay or to neuter?

We’ve all heard the phrase, “multiplying like rabbits,” meaning reproducing like crazy, and that’s what bunnies tend to do when sexually mature female and male rabbits are housed together. So, if you have rabbits that have already reached puberty (the age of which depends on breed, with smaller rabbits maturing at 4-5 months of age and larger ones maturing at 5-8 months of age), unless you want more of them, you will need to separate
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